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MEMBER RESOURCES

Information is rapidly changing.  GBREB will update this post as new information becomes available. There's a lot of information about government's response to COVID-19, however we have narrowed the focus of this page to issues impacting the real estate industry to serve as a resource for our members. 

Additional information, including legal advisories are available to members here .

MASSACHUSETTS EXECUTIVE ORDERS AND ADVISORIES
Reopening in Massachusetts 5/18/19
Phase 1 Re-Opening Safety Standards For Workplaces , EOHED, 5/12/20
Re-opening: Four Phase Approach, EOHED, 5/12/20
Advisory on Residential Evictions , Massachusetts Attorney General, 5/8/20
Short-term residential rentals, Department of Public Health, 3/31/20
Mortgage Loan Borrowing , Division of Banks, 3/25/20
Constuction Letter With Guidance  3/25/20
COVID-19 ESSENTIAL SERVICES  Order of  the Governor Assuring Continued Operation Of Essential Services  
Essential Services FAQ
SMOKE ORDER Smoke Alarm and Carbon Monoxide Inspections for One and Two-Family Dwellings and Three to Five-family Apartment Buildings
Standing Order Housing Court
DHCD Resources For Renters and Homeowners

BOSTON EXECUTIVE ORDERS AND ADVISORIES
Rental Relief Fund
Guidelines For Open House and Apartment Showing Policy
Construction Update 5.6.20
Construction Notice 3/25/20
Construction Permitting 3/16/20

DIVISION AND AFFILIATE RESOURCE PAGES

Building Owners and Managers, BOMA Boston, BOMA International
Multifamily Apartments, Massachusetts Apartment Association, National Apartment Association   
REALTORS, Greater Boston Association of REALTORS, Massachusetts Association of REALTORS, National Association of REALTORS
Commercial Brokers Association
Real Estate Finance Association






COVID-19
GBREB
 

GBREB News

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Article Courtesy of: Inman News
By: Nicole Solari
  
Buying a property without seeing it in person is hardly ideal. But, in the new world created by COVID-19, virtual touring is becoming increasingly common.

Here are 10 ways to help your buyers land a property they’ll love — whenever they see it live for the first time — while keeping yourself from being the person they blame for selling them a property they hate.

1. Be specific and realistic about wants/needs and expectations

We all try to establish upfront what buyers want and need from their next property before they begin their home search. That’s even more crucial if they’re only seeing properties online. As agents, we rely on visual cues when we’re viewing  properties with our clients to give us our bone-deep understanding of what buyers hope to find (and what they wouldn’t have if you gave it to them).

Without your buyers beside you, discovering that information is going to take in-depth conversation — and a lot of it. Even then, you can only see the things that jump out at you, smell the scents you notice and hear the sounds that annoy you. There is no guarantee your reactions will mirror theirs, and they need to know that.

2. Measure furniture before it’s packed

Instead of buying furniture to fit their new home, most clients try to buy homes that fit their furniture. So, buyers need to provide you the measurements of their must-have pieces so you can tell whether they’ll fit through the door and into their prospective new home.

Advise them to keep those measurements with them instead of packing them away in a box. They’ll need them at the other end of their move.

3. Buyers need to master online search tools

Whichever listing site your clients use, encourage them to look beyond the property photos. On realtor.com, for example, the map feature offers various views of the property along with overlays providing additional information on schools, crime rates, distance to services and so on.

Google Earth enables buyers to view the neighborhood from varied levels. Buyers may try to pass on the job of exploring the neighborhood to you. Don’t let them.

4. Use phones for interactive visual tours

We’re all getting a bit more accustomed to this new way of “showing” property, but it’s crucial to use virtual tours as buyers zero in on properties they may decide to purchase. The pre-purchase “tour” (which you may need to do several of) is aimed first at giving them insight into the way the home’s rooms relate to each other.

At the end, your clients should be able to sketch a rough floor plan. After that, your visual tours should focus on details such as how well-lit various spaces are, whether there are cracks in ceilings or walls that don’t show up in photographs, finishes in kitchen and bath, and so on.

5. Bring in the surrogates — with tape measures

Ideally, your clients have friends or family members who can view properties on their behalf and take the measurements your buyers need most. You want to bend over backwards to accommodate these folks, even if they need to measure a single window. These folks are gold — for your clients and you.

6. Write contingent offers

Sellers, naturally, are wary of accepting offers from people who have never seen the property. So, you may not want to make an offer contingent on your buyers seeing it. But the standard inspection contingency (and loan approval) periods provide opportunity for an on-site visit by the buyers or their surrogates.

Even buyers who have toured properties in person need to revisit them during the inspection period. So, urge your absentee buyers to visit, if at all possible, personally or through surrogates during the inspection period.

7. Talk to the inspectors

Home, pest and other inspectors make great surrogates. And buyers almost never use them that way, despite every inspector welcoming questions. You’ll do yourself and your buyers a favor if you press absentee buyers to talk one-on-one with the authors of the inspection reports you need them to read and understand thoroughly.

8. Prepare buyers to walk into a smaller, uglier reality

Not seeing a property firsthand before closing just about guarantees reality won’t compare with the mental image homebuyers have created of it. The property will look smaller and emptier. It will look shabbier, as virtually all pre-owned homes do. It will smell like someone else’s home.

And the neighbor’s house will be a disturbing shade of school-bus yellow, which appeared much lighter on Google Maps. They will feel like they paid too much. You can’t change those feelings, but you can assure buyers they’re normal — preferably in advance.

9. Grid paper rules

Despite your best efforts, your buyers may still feel let down when they walk into their new empty house. Help them cope by stocking the entry with a pad of grid paper, a tape measure, a ruler and several brand new sharp pencils. Let them know their first job is to measure the rooms and create a scale drawing of each room on the grid paper. Their second job is to haul out their furniture measurements and start arranging furniture on paper before their moving truck pulls up.

If you have a handyman you rely on, share contact information with your buyers. In other words, give them the tools to see that the house they just bought can be the home they love sooner rather than later.

10. A great agent is the key to success

Representing buyers purchasing properties sight-unseen is one of the most difficult challenges any agent faces, because so much can go wrong. Plus, you can easily get sucked into viewing endless numbers of properties, sketching multiple floor plans to email your buyers, and getting mired in the search without ever approaching the finish line.

In general, you don’t want to take on absentee buyers unless they face a near-term purchase deadline, and they understand what you can do and what you can’t.

Agents, for the most part, are can-do people. We’re not accustomed much to focusing on what we can’t do. But in the case of absentee buyers, that’s a crucial step in defining your role upfront. You can only do you; you can’t be them. And everybody needs to accept that.

Nicole Solari is owner and managing broker of The Solari Group in Solano and Napa Counties in Northern California. Nicole runs one of the highest producing brokerages in all of Northern California.
10 Tips For Buyers Putting in Offers Sight Unseen Amid Coronavirus
GBAR

COVID-19 Resources for the BOMA CRE Community

BOMA Boston updates this page regularly with local, national, and real estate news, notices, and resources. 

News and bulletins: 
GBREB legal analysis of Massachusetts eviction moratorium - 4/21 Read now
Homeland Security guidance on Essential Critical Infrastructure workers - 4/17 - Read now
Opening Up America. View Here
Boston COVID-19 Advisories and News from Mayor Walsh. Read now
BOMA International Analysis of Federal government's CARES Act for Commercial Real Estate. Read now
GBREB legal analysis of rent collection issues during COVID-19. Read now
GBREB legal analysis of Massachusetts "essential services" for Commercial Real Estate. Read now
NAA new COVID-19 federal laws. Watch now
BOMA International tenant FAQ. Read now 
Massachusetts construction and worksite guidelines. Read now

Resources:

BOMA International Resources center
BOMA International Building checklist 
5/26/20 Tishman Speyer - Returning to the Workplace
State Legislations on COVID - 19 - Compiled by BOMA International 
CDC guidance for businesses
BOMA Canada Pandemic Guide
BOMA International Twitter - many helpful news stories and updates from around the web
Maa.gov Resources and news 
CCIM Guidance for Landlords - Read now 
Boston Public Health Commission - New Guidance on Face Coverings - Read Now
National Governor's Association - State legislations and regulations 
InspiRE Thought Leadership Series: COVID-19  *Highly recommended*
Recovery Readiness How To Guide by Cushman & Wakefield - 4/22 - Read Now:  recovery
Safe Six Workplace Readiness Checklist by Cushman & Wakefield - 4/22  - Read Now
ATI Go Back Safely Program Guide

GBREB Webinars
BOMA/MAA - Managing Stress in Difficult Times - Ways to reduce and manage stress signals at home and work, 5/7 - Watch Now
BOMA - The Great Re-Occupancy - Practical steps to prepare commercial buildings for a return to work, 5/7 - Watch Now
REFA - What's Next for Hospitality and Retail - Thoughts and analysis from RE financial leaders, 5/7 - Watch Now
MAA - Boston Multifamily Market in Tumultuous Times - Research from Apartments.com Economist, 5/6 - Watch Now
REFA - COVID-19 and the Retail Sector - Predictions from RE finance leaders, 4/28 - Watch Now
BOMA/MAA - Listen Up! with Elise Simard - Using listening skills to build relationships in business, 4/15 - Watch Now
BOMA - Key Business Practices During Uncertain Times - Info about CARES act, taxes, etc., 4/14 - Watch Now

Other  Webinars

BOMA International - Risk Mitigation, Planning, and Preparing for Re-Occupancy - 4/8
BOMA Canada - The View from China - How Beijing is Recovering - 4/8
BOMA International - Business Interruption Insurance - 4/7
BOMA Canada - Legal and Human Resources during COVID 19 - 4/6
BOMA International - Maintaining Building Operations and Preparing for Re-Occupancy - 3/26 - Watch now and re-hosted 4/8 Register Now

BOMA Georgia
 - Effectively Managing and Leading Remote Employees - 3/26
BOMA Georgia  - Improving your Effectiveness as a Remote Employee - 3/25
Bisnow Webinar Managing Properties in the Age of Coronavirus - 3/19
BOMA/Seattle-King County Coronavirus Webinar with Building Operations Focus - 3/17
BOMA Canada's Lessons from the Frontlines: Responses to Recent Coronavirus Cases in Commercial Office Buildings - 3/16
BOMA/Georgia Coronavirus Webinar in Partnership with APIC - 3/12
CBRE Podcast on the economy and CRE- The Weekly Take - Listen Now

What you can do:
Support our neighbors in need:
Give to BOMA's Charitable Partner, Bridge Over Troubled Waters, a shelter and support system for homeless youth in Boston. Donate now
Give to a food bank in your community or the Greater Boston Food Bank. Donate now
Give blood at your local blood bank. Find a location 
Donate PPE supplies to local hospitals. Find a location
See how our own BOMA members are making a difference. Read now

COVID-19 Resources for BOMA
GBREB

 
COVID-19 Resources for the Apartment Community

MAA regularly updates this page with local, national, and apartment industry news, notices, and resources. 

News:
GBREB legal analysis of Massachusetts eviction moratorium - 4/21 - Read now 
Massachusetts eviction moratorium, signed by Governor Baker - 4/21 - Read now
Opening Up America. View Here
Analysis of FEMA Framework for Reopening America by InspiRE - 4/15 - Read now
NAA - Rental Housing Industry analysis of CARES Act - 4/1. Read now
GBREB legal analysis of rent collection issues during COVID-19. Read now
Mass Guidance on Essential Critical Infrastructure Workers - 3/28. Read now 
GBREB legal analysis of Massachusetts "essential services" for Commercial Real Estate. Read now
NAA new COVID-19 federal laws. Watch now
Massachusetts construction and worksite guidelines. Read now
Housing Court standing order - 3/13. Read now 
Guidelines for open house and apartment showings in Boston. Read now 

GBREB Webinars
BOMA/MAA - Managing Stress in Difficult Times - Ways to reduce and manage stress signals at home and work, 5/7 - Watch Now
BOMA - The Great Re-Occupancy - Practical steps to prepare commercial buildings for a return to work, 5/7 - Watch Now
REFA - What's Next for Hospitality and Retail - Thoughts and analysis from RE financial leaders, 5/7 - Watch Now
MAA - Boston Multifamily Market in Tumultuous Times - Research from Apartments.com Economist, 5/6 - Watch Now
REFA - COVID-19 and the Retail Sector - Predictions from RE finance leaders, 4/28 - Watch Now
BOMA/MAA - Listen Up! with Elise Simard - Using listening skills to build relationships in business, 4/15 - Watch Now
BOMA - Key Business Practices During Uncertain Times - Info about CARES act, taxes, etc., 4/14 - Watch Now

Real Estate Resources:
National Apartment Association resources, including relevant government and legal news, daily micro-webinars, best practices, tips for working from home, HUD communications, cleaning advice, and more
NAA webinars and videos including daily micro-webinars 
5/26/20 Tishman Speyer - Returning to the Workplace
National Apartment Association Twitter - many helpful news stories and updates from around the web
NAA Breakdown of $1 of Rent - Video and Infographic 
NAA Webinar - 6 Feet Apart for Suppliers - 4/15 - Watch Now
ATI Go Back Safely Program Guide

Government and other Resources:
Home readiness checklist by CDC 
Legal advisories from Boston law firm, Nutter 
Grace Hill resources  - COVID 19 Team training manuals available for download 
Mass.gov DPH Corona virus news and updates
MA Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) Resources 
Boston Public Health Commission - New Guidance on Face Coverings - Read Now 


What you can do:
*Help your residents or others find what they need: Winn Companies CONNECT: Use CONNECT to search for free and reduced cost services like food, healthcare, job opportunities, benefits enrollment, rent assistance and more. 

Give to MAA's Charitable Partner, Rosie's Place, a shelter and support system for homeless women in Boston. Donate now

Give to a food bank in your community or the Greater Boston Food Bank. Donate now


COVID-19 Resources for MAA
MAA
GBREB NEWS

MEMBER RESOURCES

Information is rapidly changing.  GBREB will update this post as new information becomes available. There's a lot of information about government's response to COVID-19, however we have narrowed the focus of this page to issues impacting the real estate industry to serve as a resource for our members. 

Additional information, including legal advisories are available to members here .

MASSACHUSETTS EXECUTIVE ORDERS AND ADVISORIES
Reopening in Massachusetts 5/18/19
Phase 1 Re-Opening Safety Standards For Workplaces , EOHED, 5/12/20
Re-opening: Four Phase Approach, EOHED, 5/12/20
Advisory on Residential Evictions , Massachusetts Attorney General, 5/8/20
Short-term residential rentals, Department of Public Health, 3/31/20
Mortgage Loan Borrowing , Division of Banks, 3/25/20
Constuction Letter With Guidance  3/25/20
COVID-19 ESSENTIAL SERVICES  Order of  the Governor Assuring Continued Operation Of Essential Services  
Essential Services FAQ
SMOKE ORDER Smoke Alarm and Carbon Monoxide Inspections for One and Two-Family Dwellings and Three to Five-family Apartment Buildings
Standing Order Housing Court
DHCD Resources For Renters and Homeowners

BOSTON EXECUTIVE ORDERS AND ADVISORIES
Rental Relief Fund
Guidelines For Open House and Apartment Showing Policy
Construction Update 5.6.20
Construction Notice 3/25/20
Construction Permitting 3/16/20

DIVISION AND AFFILIATE RESOURCE PAGES

Building Owners and Managers, BOMA Boston, BOMA International
Multifamily Apartments, Massachusetts Apartment Association, National Apartment Association   
REALTORS, Greater Boston Association of REALTORS, Massachusetts Association of REALTORS, National Association of REALTORS
Commercial Brokers Association
Real Estate Finance Association






COVID-19
GBREB

 

Article Courtesy of: Inman News
By: Erica Ramus

Adjust to the situation, be conservative in your planning, and prepare for a slow recovery

In challenging times, it’s a smart idea to revisit the fundamentals of good business. This April, go Back to Basics with Inman.

It’s April, and while we should be in the midst of our hot spring real estate market, we’re instead in one hell of a storm. It’s worse than just the mid-winter blues or holiday slowdown.

Here in Pennsylvania, we are in a deep freeze. Our governor shut non-life essential businesses down a month ago. We can’t show houses in person, and we have been ordered not to move forward with appraisals, inspections or closings if a contract was signed after March 18. We’ve been told not to even put signs up or lockboxes on houses.

Although it might not be that bad in most other states, with limited business allowed to move forward here, we are at a full stop. As current contracts move slowly to closing, the pipeline is getting thinner and thinner.

Last year, I wrote that a downturn was likely in the near future. I didn’t have a crystal ball, and I damn sure didn’t see a global pandemic coming. But real estate is cyclical, so all business owners in general (including brokers and individual agents too) should have a plan for when business hits a bump. For more on increasing your income as the market turns, read “5 tips for boosting your bottom line in a down market.”

The article identifies basic ways to help you get through a downturn. It’s a good start. But this isn’t a bump. We are now in a recession and maybe a full-blown economic crisis as the year goes on.

Recovery is unlikely to be swift for the real estate industry. After the changes we’ve been through in the past two months, we are probably not going to open our doors at the beginning of May or June and see a flood of new contracts to replace the spring buyers who are sidelined.

Buyers and sellers might still be nervous and might shy away from viewing houses. Many have lost their jobs and might not even qualify for a loan after we are cleared to do business again.

Brokers need to take a look at the budget created at the end of 2019 and probably consider it useless at this point. I have looked at the budgets of several other brokers plus mine, and based on the numbers I am seeing, I am preparing for a potential 40 percent drop in commission income this year. Expenses must be adjusted accordingly to balance the income loss. Here’s how to adjust your budget for this unprecedented year.

1. Evaluate recurring charges

Look at your monthly credit card statements to see what you are paying for automatically. You’d be surprised at how much you won’t even miss. If you really cannot make decisions here, call your business credit card in as lost or misplaced, and get a new one.
You’ll be forced to re-enter your new card number on each and every platform again, which sometimes brings a new light to those fees. Even small monthly fees add up — and a few dozen $10 a month (or more) services add up at the end of the year.

2. Bid out insurances

Insurance tends to creep up slowly and without you noticing, especially if you’re on automatic payment. I have a folder for each insurance type, and on the front, as I pay the bill each year, I write down the premium so it’s easy to compare year over year. I do this with both personal and business insurances.

Last year, I saw a 25 percent increase in my homeowner’s policy for no explainable reason. I switched carriers and actually cut my bill by 10 percent. Watch your errors and omissions insurance rates, business owners policy, auto and other insurances carefully for increases.

3. Review contractors

I moved our office in January, and it was the perfect time to review all contractors — the cleaning service, HVAC provider, office supply vendor, etc. I cut the cleaning bill while increasing the visit frequency by using a service that already cleans for other tenants in the new building.

I found a local office supply vendor that beat the prices for the big office supply store we used before we moved. You might be able to shave 10 percent off these line items by negotiating with vendors.

4. Negotiate rent

Commercial real estate is in for a crunch. When this crisis is over, a lot of businesses will realize just how expensive space is. Some who work from home now might not return to the office. You might find that some of your staff can still work remotely (admins or transaction coordinators). Some agents who previously used office space might decide to work from home.

Rent is a huge expense. If you’re having a problem paying it, look at cutting your office space down or renegotiating the lease. Tenants across many industries are doing this right now. Your landlord might be willing to work with you just to keep a good tenant in the space.

If they cannot or will not let you cut your rent or space size, consider moving. I moved across town earlier this year and got a larger space with a better parking situation for less money. The move was a hassle, but in the end, it was perfectly timed for this crisis situation.

5. Cut staffing

Next to rent, many brokers’ biggest expense is support staff. If your office is closed, you’ve probably laid off or terminated admins. Fewer deals in the pipeline mean you’ll need fewer hands on the files.

You simply cannot afford to keep people on payroll when there is less work to do. It’s inevitable, even if it is unpleasant to let people go. As things ramp up, you can bring people back on staff as needed.

6. Outsource

You might find that as you let staff go, some tasks can be better handled by outsourcing as they are needed. Do you need a bookkeeper on staff, or can you hire a contractor for 10-15 hours a week to do your books?

Some marketing or transaction coordinator tasks could be done more efficiently and less expensively by outsourcing as needed rather than keeping someone on payroll. Look into online platforms where contractors specialize in the service you need.

7. Watch supplies

Sometimes, it pays to buy in bulk — buy several cases of copy paper when they are on sale, for example. When cash flow is tight, pay attention to supplies. Although it might be more expensive to order a few reams of paper at a time, as small broker with limited cash flow, it might be smarter to do that than tie up too much money in bulk ordering. The few dollars saved on cases of paper might not be worth it when the rent is due.

8. Market smart

This is one of the five recommendations from the article I wrote last year, but it bears repeating. Do not cut marketing out completely. Instead, make sure you are spending your dollars in a smart way. Cut advertising — meaning print ads, billboards, radio ads, etc., if you cannot directly track it back to a solid ROI (return on investment).

Do not cut marketing in general — pivot.

For example, I have one online marketing source that brings me a 4-5 ROI. So for every $1 I spend on this venue, I get $4 to $5 back that I can directly track to a closed sale. I am not cutting that source out right now. As long as I see a positive ROI, I will keep it.

I have seen my competitors cut this same tool. I watch it carefully and see them dropping off the platform. I am holding firm, and our leads from it were up 27 percent the first two weeks of April.

If you do cut things out, don’t just hibernate. Practice guerrilla marketing — marketing with your labor and time, not money.

Increase your networking. Although in-person meetings aren’t really possible right now, you can always pick up your phone. Call past clients and referral sources just to ask how they are doing.

Our local chamber of commerce has moved its mixers to a Zoom format. Attend events online. Find ways to still network with your community and show you are still in business and still helping people buy and sell, but remotely.

9. Be careful with debt

If you must take on debt, do so carefully and after speaking to a good accountant. Yes, there are new emergency loans through the Small Business Administration (SBA) due to the crisis. The Payroll Protection Program is actually a loan that turns into a grant if you follow the rules and use it for payroll and allowed expenses. Most loans out there are not forgivable and will need to be repaid eventually. Not all have favorable terms, and some are outright predatory.

Business owners want to think that a loan can save us from drowning or at least buy time until the market rebounds. Some are smart moves, while others will just sink your business eventually no matter what you do. Don’t just sign for a loan without getting advice first.

10. Cut travel

I’m a conference junkie. I love to travel to conferences and learn from brokers all over the country. I come back from industry gatherings pumped up with ideas on how to better serve our clients. COVID-19 has killed that for the foreseeable future.

Even without travel restrictions and social distancing rules, in downturns, travel is still a luxury. If you’re not being paid to travel or reimbursed your expenses by a third party, travel needs to be severely limited. Instead, take advantage of conferences that can be “attended” online, such as Inman’s Connect Now June event.

After this crisis passes, perhaps this is the future of many conferences and learning events. As I type that, I hope it is not completely true, as the friendships and lobbycon meetups can be just as valuable as the conference sessions, if not more sometimes. Agents as a group are social people, and the in-person hugs and late-night lobby discussions make some of the best memories.

If you are a broker who has been in business pre-2008, you are well-versed in preparing for a downturn. I opened my office in 2007 and made it through by cutting my teeth on the mortgage crisis. This is a very different crisis — but with similar tactics. We will survive it. In January, with the move, I began cutting expenses. That was more luck than foresight, honestly.

Nobody could have foreseen what March and April would bring to the real estate business. Now that we are in the thick of it, all we can do is adjust to the situation. Be conservative in your planning, and prepare for a slow recovery. Things might never go back to pre-2020 “normal,” but all we can do is adjust the sails and weather this storm.

Erica Ramus, MRE, is the broker/owner of RAMUS Real Estate. You can follow her on Twitter or LinkedIn.
10 Steps For Cutting Your Brokerage's Budget Now
GBAR

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

MAA is proud of our members by giving back to the community, always, but especially in these times. See below for some good stories during these troubling times.  If your company or a peer is doing something great to give back, feel free to email Courtney McHugh, cmchugh@gbreb.com to be featured on this page.
The Peabody Companies partnered with the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program(BHCHP) , completing a clothing drive with employees donating gloves, hats and undergarments to the organization. The company itself matched the donations, purchasing 20 winter coats to accompany the teams donation. Click here for the full story.
Support MAA's Charitable Partner, Rosie's Place! Click here to view what they are doing and how you can help.
By purchasing meals through Feed the Frontlines Boston, you will help fuel the extraordinary efforts of our city's healthcare workers while also supporting our local restaurants and employees. With your support Viga Italian Eatery and Shed's BBQ can delivery healthy, fresh and free meals to Boston's amazing doctors, nurses and medical staff. Click here to take action!
MAA Gives Back!
MAA

BOMA Boston is proud of our members by giving back to the community, always, but especially in these times. See below for some good stories during these troubling times.
If your company or a peer is doing something great to give back, feel free to email Courtney McHugh, cmchugh@gbreb.com to be featured on this page.


BOMA is proud of our Benefit Sponsors who generously donated their sponsorship dollars and dozens of members who purchased raffle tickets online for a combined total of $45,000 that we were able to donate to our charitable partner, Bridge Over Troubled Waters! Every year, Bridge Over Troubled Waters serves over 2,000 homeless, runaway and at-risk youth. Right now, with schools closed, many hourly jobs shut down, and some unsafe home environments, Bridge provides crucial shelter, food, resources and social services for the youth of Boston. Click here to view their website and donate!

Rockhill Management's highly anticipated Food Hall, High Street Place, was set to open in March between Federal Street and High Street in Boston.  Although the doors have not yet opened, several of the restaurant partner's are still there cooking meals for front-line workers during the COVID-19 crisis in hospitals in the Greater Boston area. Click here for the full story. 

In March 2020, Siena Construction completed a fast-track laboratory conversion project for the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, providing an important addition to the scientific research challenges posed by the COVID-19 Pandemic. Click here to view the full story.

BOMA Members from Progroup Contracting are raising funds to purchase Ipads for local hospitals with COVID-19 patients to ensure that they are able to connect with their loved ones. Click here to donate.

By purchasing meals through Feed the Frontlines Boston, you will help fuel the extraordinary efforts of our city's healthcare workers while also supporting our local restaurants and employees. With your support Viga Italian Eatery and Shed's BBQ can delivery healthy, fresh and free meals to Boston's amazing doctors, nurses and medical staff. Click here to take action!




BOMA Gives Back!
GBREB

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Check out the May edition of the MAA Insider- featuring highlights from past events, information on upcoming events plus local and national multifamily news.

Read the May MAA Insider.
MAA Insider - May 2020
MAA

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Virtual Connect With BOMA Sessions
Virtual Meeting
 
BOMI Real Estate Investment And Finance - Postponed
Alexandria Real Estate
 
Building Maintenance & Facility Operations Best Practices
10:00am
 
Rentals The Right Way! (Live Webinar)
Webinar
9:00am
 
NAAEI CAMT - POSTPONED
ARS Restoration Specialists
8:30am